Adversity: A Distinct B School Advantage

When I was taking classes at the Whitman School of Management at Syracuse University’s Entrepreneurial Bootcamp for Veterans with Disabilities Program, my professor Dr. Mike Haynie challenged my thinking. He had this knack for storytelling and he’s so insightful that he was recently awarded a Ted Talk. But on this day in class he let Aimee Mullins do the talking through a brief video. Mullins shared her story about how being typically thought of as disabled has given her a distinct competitive advantage. I’d argue it gave her the ability to think creatively. In her Ted Talk she asks children to give her suggestions on if she wanted to jump over a building, what sorts of legs would they build for her. Immediately the children took clues from nature like frogs and kangaroos. And what’s interesting to note is that those children were doing exactly what the folks at the Biomimicry Institute do on a daily basis—they were looking to nature to solve a problem. And what’s interesting to note is that not only were the children limitless in their thinking but they imagined a far greater outcome than just jumping over a building—they thought she could fly, too.

Professor Haynie brought to light the idea that innovation often comes from adversity, limitations and shortcomings. He made us think how we could look at the world around us and see problems that others found invisible and begin to brainstorm solutions that were previously undiscovered. As further illustration, Mullins said that she called for innovations—one might argue who are childlike in their thinking: curious, limitless and unhindered by others’ perceptions—to design new legs and make prothesis making an art form. Fashion designers made her boots, innovators created kangaroo like legs that allowed her to sprint faster than many people with two naturally created stems and others allowed her to vary her height based on the size shoe she wanted to wear that day and Mullins friends’ became jealous of her previously-thought-of-disability because it gave her the advantage of changing her height.

Professor Haynie made us think about how we too could solve problems as entrepreneurs, how we could change our thoughts to imagine the impossible, think of solutions to things that were once thought of as impossible and he demonstrated through Mullins that adversity is not what we think. It is not a setback but rather an opportunity uniquely to the person facing the obstacle to trek a path that was previously unexplored.

I’m not saying that Syracuse is the only B school to be touting ideas like these to inspire the next generation of entrepreneurs, but I can say with confidence that unless a college or university can challenge your thinking in this way that it is a waste of time and money. If B school doesn’t drastically alter the way you’ve been thinking, working and imagining the future than it has failed in it’s endeavor to educate you.

About the Author


Named Top 100 Leaders by 2012 Magazine, Jasmine Grimm has been nominated for Central Penn Business Journal’s “Top 40 Under 40,” and The Lancaster Chamber’s ATHENA Award.
Jasmine founded Ruby, Inc. a personal styling business that teaches women how to dress for their body types and became a two-time nominee for Inc. Magazine’s Top 30 Under 30 Top Young Entrepreneurs in America. She won the 2013 SCORE Business Development Award, the won the Central Penn Business Journal’s Top 25 Women of Influence Award in 2013 and the 2013 Leadership Award from the MS Society.
She has been a popular guest lecturer at the Maastricht Institute of Entrepreneurship and has been featured in Under 30 CEO and Productive Magazine, was the cover story for Harrisburg Magazine and her writing has graced National Geographic Television and Film, Harvard University and more.

She’s a 5,3,8,3 on the Kolbe A Index and her strengths include input, relator, learner, responsibility and achievement.

View her Google+ page here. 

Intrapreneurship: Lessons from B School and Experience

When I was taking classes at Syracuse, Professor Mike Haynie introduced me to the concept of intrapreneuship. I had no clue such roles existed but I reflected back on the job I was working at the time and realized that I was an intrepreneur.

That was revolutionary.

I learned an intrepreneur behaves like an entrepreneur within a large organization. Famous examples might include the Skunk Works operation at Lockheed Martin’s Advanced Development Programs (ADP), formerly called Lockheed Advanced Development Projects. Their job was to come up with new ideas in aerospace, whereas mine was to develop a magazine from the ground up in a digital-only fashion.

In hindsight I can tell you that intrapreneurship is much more challenging that it’s more famous counterpart.

Having studied under Guy Kawasaki a bit at school and having read his books, I can tell you that when he says from the outside it looks like intrapreneurs have it made because they have pre-existing infrastructure, sales teams, technology, and really, they don’t have to worry about writing a business plan or raising capital—it seems like a cakewalk.

But it’s not.

One of the most challenging aspects of intrepreneurship is that you have to assume the risks of the endeavor but relinquish control of the success. For example, I personally won an award, I didn’t win it, the company did. But if I failed in some endeavor, or if anyone failed for that matter, I had to assume responsibility for it. It’s maddening at times but it also serves as entrepreneurship with training wheels.

It teaches you balance: can you balance the demands of the customers with the demands of the company? Can you balance the wants of the stakeholders knowing that it’s not going to work with the technology? Can you tell someone why an idea isn’t going to work because you have become a specialist in your field and still have them listen even when you’re not the ultimate decision-maker?

It’s maddening at times. I remember as the project reached year three, having won awards, grown readership and figured out how to parlay blogging techniques into a medium where those strategies weren’t previously done, it seemed like everything changed. I felt like I was a blind dog walking around in a house where the furniture kept changing. I’m not saying anything disparaging about the company where I was working nor is it a comment on the stakeholders. Rather, I think it was growing pains for the publication. We reached a crux where we weren’t sure where we were going: turnover, lack of sales goals met, management structure changing and more. About two years before the magazine ultimately ended, I realized that the magazine wouldn’t survive because I had learned a critical concept in business school that I didn’t know before: brands and companies exist to solve problems. This concept I was working on created more problems than it solved and the pain point that it aimed to solve wasn’t pressing enough to overlook the other details. Had I have known that concept before I started the magazine I don’t know if I would have taken on the project. Yes, I would have worked for the company. Yes, I would have continued in journalism and yes, I loved figuring out problems that didn’t have a solution before but if it doesn’t solve a problem it’s all ultimately futile.

If I were to do a post mortem on the project, I could dissect it and see all the instances where I went wrong.

First, I would have looked at the project and asked myself seriously: does this project solve any pressing problems? If not, it’s going to fail.

Everything that works for a large company will be the antithesis of what works for an intrapreneur. If everyone is going in one direction, you have to stop and go the other way. It’s painful. It’s embarrassing to present ideas that no one else supports, but because they’re not operating from a start-up perspective, they won’t see the problem until it impacts them and their cash cow.

I wish, in hindsight, all of my meetings with the team were in a separate environment. It sounds silly but you’d be amazed at how many times we’d pull off an idea only to get in trouble for it first and then have it succeed later. Getting in trouble used to mean that I was on the wrong path, but with intrapreneurship it meant I was doing something that was getting attention and therefore it was frightening to the stakeholders. If we could have operated in a silo and presented to the company what we were learning from first-hand experience developing something from the ground up, I think it would have made the team more cohesive and we could have celebrated our accomplishments without being fearful of losing our jobs because of the failures—and there were many.

My team and I were often left alone with our projects—which is good in many cases but it also made us feel isolated from the rest of the company. However, it wasn’t until the final season of the publication did I feel like I had a team with that something special where they weren’t afraid to take risks and see what worked, and have the grit to say, well, that didn’t, let’s try again.

I wish we would have been able to share the data and lessons we learned with the rest of the organization. We learned some valuable lessons from our experiment. We learned what worked, and what didn’t. We could have used these best practices for other publishing houses to emulate. And in some ways we did, but we could have contributed more.

I learned that success within a company is measured in miles and success in an intrapreneurial role is measured in millimeters.

Finally, I wish I would have just flown under the radar. I wish that I would have been able to keep my trap shut and just have done my job quietly so that when we succeeded, someone else could tout our success and when we failed, no one would be impacted by it. But I didn’t.

And so ultimately I learned that intrapreneurship, in some ways it very much like entrepreneurship. It’s riddled with risks. It might not work. It’s got to solve a pressing problem and ultimately it has to make money to survive.

Had I have known all of these lessons from Syracuse, and not the school of hard knocks, I think I would have been able to make far wiser decisions.

In the end, would I change any day of it? No way. It paved the way for me to start my own company because in its failure it gave me the ultimate lesson of all: the courage to fail publically and continue to try despite the many obstacles against me.

About the Author
Named Top 100 Leaders by 2012 Magazine, Jasmine Grimm has been nominated for Central Penn Business Journal’s “Top 40 Under 40,” and The Lancaster Chamber’s ATHENA Award.

Jasmine founded Ruby, Inc. a personal styling business that teaches women how to dress for their body types and became a two-time nominee for Inc. Magazine’s Top 30 Under 30 Top Young Entrepreneurs in America. She won the 2013 SCORE Business Development Award, the won the Central Penn Business Journal’s Top 25 Women of Influence Award in 2013 and the 2013 Leadership Award from the MS Society.

She has been a popular guest lecturer at the Maastricht Institute of Entrepreneurship and has been featured in Under 30 CEO and Productive Magazine, was the cover story for Harrisburg Magazine and her writing has graced National Geographic Television and Film, Harvard University and more.

She’s a 5,3,8,3 on the Kolbe A Index and her strengths include input, relator, learner, responsibility and achievement.

For more information visit her Google + Page.

The 3 Most Important Lessons I Learned in Business School

A teacher once called me a “scholar, just because she loves learning for the sake of learning.” But really, I’m just intensely curious. Certain topics resonate with me-I love learning about leadership on the web, going to Chamber of Commerce functions like Professional Development Fridays, and Excellence Exchanges where CEOs share their struggles and their business journeys with key takeaways . Others don’t–I’m not a fan of learning about accounting. I doubt I’d ever long to be a CFO, although I highly respect the position. I just want to make something. I want to solve a need. I’m drawn to social-entrepreneurship.

Briefly some of the most important lessons I gleaned from business school were to learn from others; mirror the greats; embrace free education from top ranked institutions, and don’t let fear prevent you from change. 

The first most important lesson I learned in business school: opportunities exist to learn constantly. Once you graduate not only will you have the opportunity to network but we want to show you a sliver of what you can learn on the web about business for free.

At business school, Professor Mike Haynie, said and I paraphrase to the best of my recollection, that he rather enjoyed studying businesses run by hippies. I remember he was teaching us at the Entrepreneurial Bootcamp for Veterans with Disabilities program at Syracuse University, and he started telling us about this company out in Colorado that makes beer. He talked about how they were faced with an interesting issue: should they abandon their way of life with their business and sell it to a larger company for millions or did they value culture more? Well, I hate to spoil the end of the story but I will. They chose people over profits.

Now Professor Haynie did something I thought was interesting. He let us discuss the topic. He helped us make our own decisions before revealing the company’s answer. And through that I learned a business’ story is powerful and you can learn a lot from them by reading the Harvard Business Review and Inc. Magazine along with going to Chamber of Commerce sponsored events like Excellence Exchanges and Professional Development days.

The first lesson: Learn from other’s examples. Mirror the greats. 

The second most important lesson I learned was that there are numerous opportunities on the Internet to learn for free. Haynie’s presentation included numerous outlets that I didn’t know exist: like Standford’s Carly Fiorina: The Dynamics of Change and Fear.

 

I learned two important lessons from this speech.

One: Ivy League presentations are available online. For free.

Second, fear holds all of us from change.

Embrace the fear and do it anyway because the only way you can help them overcome their fear is to give them a bigger vision to achieve.

Scoff if you will, but in my opinion Disney’s The Croods is an excellent example of how to lead a family to a a greater vision and it’s also a great example of how to lead through fear in business.

Managers–like the Dad–wanted to maintain the status quo. He ruled by fear. Fear of death. The change for the family came from the vision of a young “Guy,” a  leader, inspires them to reach past their fears and hope for a greater vision.

And really as entrepreneurs that’s what we want to do: we want to proverbially leave the cave and explore a new world.

So in the end, some of the most important lessons I gleaned from business school were learn from others and mirror the greats, there are many ways to learn as an entrepreneur for free while still learning from top ranked business institutions, and fear prevents all of us from change. 

 

About the Author

Named Top 100 Leaders by 2012 Magazine, Jasmine Grimm has been nominated for Central Penn Business Journal’s “Top 40 Under 40,” and The Lancaster Chamber’s ATHENA Award.

Jasmine founded Ruby, Inc. a personal styling business that teaches women how to dress for their body types and became a two-time nominee for Inc. Magazine’s Top 30 Under 30 Top Young Entrepreneurs in America. She won the 2013 SCORE Business Development Award, the won the Central Penn Business Journal’s Top 25 Women of Influence Award in 2013 and the 2013 Leadership Award from the MS Society.

She has been a popular guest lecturer at the Maastricht Institute of Entrepreneurship and has been featured inUnder 30 CEO and Productive Magazine, was the cover story for Harrisburg Magazine and her writing has graced National Geographic Television and Film, Harvard University and more.

She’s a 5,3,8,3 on the Kolbe A Index and her strengths include input, relator, learner, responsibility and achievement.

For more information visit her Google + Page.

New Concept in B School Education

Do you have to go to Harvard, Stanford or the Wharton School to learn business or is there a more cost effective way to succeed?

The answer isn’t as simple as “either” “or” because there are compelling arguments on both sides. It comes down to “The Genius of And” a term coined by Jim Collins, author of Good to Great. It’s where two diametrically opposed ideas can both co-exist at the exact same time, like a living Venn Diagram where the only overlapping ideas are learning.

On one side we have business school. It’ll cost you $50,000 plus for an Ivy League education per year. Oddly enough that’s the poverty level for a family of four. On the other hand, we have mentoring, SCORE, business classes at local libraries, workshops through the local chamber of commerce, Youtube videos, Talks at Google, HBR IdeaCasts and lest we forget an entire library of college courses online, all of which are free.

I propose that both are equally valuable and one can’t exist without the other. They’re simply conduits to learn.

You see, truly exceptional scholars want to learn for the sake of learning. They’ll read all of the books necessary to work toward a goal. They’ll do their homework. They’ll research. They’ll learn. Just because it’s not in a classroom doesn’t degrade the merit of the experience. Sure, there isn’t a fancy placard that comes from learning through trial and error and Internet research to solve a pressing business problem but then again, you’re not paying an institution thousands per year just to get the paper anyway—unless, that is, you just want to be educated and not learn.

In college I had a lovely professor named Virginia Kugel-Zank who once asked the question, “What’s the difference between education and learning?” After much thought I concluded that education is where someone spoon feeds you information, learning is when you digest it.

Education is amassing a deluge of information before an event occurs when you need to apply it; learning is the application of it. Both help you become successful but neither will get you there alone. You have to have knowledge of what to do and then have the will to act on it.

So if you go to b school just to become educated and don’t bother to learn from it, you’re not successful, you just paid your dues. If you experience business lessons and don’t bother to research it, find a mentor or grow from the experience, you’ve just paid your dues. But if you bother to learn—really learn from the opportunities afforded to you, regardless of their price tag—you’ll be successful and that’s the most cost effective way to learn.

In my opinion truly remarkable businesspeople embrace both sides of the continuum: education and learning.

About the Author

Named Top 100 Leaders by 2012 Magazine, Jasmine Grimm has been nominated for Central Penn Business Journal’s “Top 40 Under 40,” and The Lancaster Chamber’s ATHENA Award.

Jasmine founded Ruby, Inc. a personal styling business that teaches women how to dress for their body types and became a two-time nominee for Inc. Magazine’s Top 30 Under 30 Top Young Entrepreneurs in America. She won the 2013 SCORE Business Development Award, the won the Central Penn Business Journal’s Top 25 Women of Influence Award in 2013 and the 2013 Leadership Award from the MS Society.

She has been a popular guest lecturer at the Maastricht Institute of Entrepreneurship and has been featured in Under 30 CEO and Productive Magazine, was the cover story for Harrisburg Magazine and her writing has graced National Geographic Television and Film, Harvard University and more.

She’s a 5,3,8,3 on the Kolbe A Index and her strengths include input, relator, learner, responsibility and achievement.

For more information visit her Google + Page.

8 Ways to Beat the High Cost of Business School

By Jasmine Grimm, founder, Ruby, Inc.

How would you like to go to one of eight schools like Syracuse, Texas A&M, Cornell, UCLA, Florida State, Purdue, University of Connecticut or LSU for free?

You can if you’re a veteran or family member.

Thanks to the Entrepreneurial Bootcamp for Veterans with Disabilities Program founded at the Whitman School of Business by Professor Mike Haynie, Executive Director and Founder of the Institute for Veterans and Military Families (IVMF), and also the Barnes Professor of Entrepreneurship at SU’s Whitman School of Management, you’ll have access to top-rated schools, mentors, capital, legal work and logo design pro bono.

The program works in three phases:
1) Study online for 30 days
2) Spend 9 days at the host campus
3) Invest a year of your time with round the clock support building your business with free access to mentors, professors, and even direct access to the Small Business Administration

Sound too good to be true?

It’s not. See the proof on 60 Minutes.

As a graduate of the Whitman School of Business through Syracuse University, I can testify that not only did I graduate and walk away with a placard, but I also left with my business plan in hand and a fully incorporated entity thanks to DLA Piper. Within a month I had my logo, local resources to grow my idea into a full-fledged business plus speed dial mentorship. By tax time my business had broken even.

As if the stellar education wasn’t enough, it was completely free. Travel costs included.

The program doesn’t end there. Each year the program holds an annual EBV Conference where budding entrepreneurs learn the latest strategies to grow their dream.

Want to learn Google + at the conference? Who better to teach it than Google?

Interested in hearing what the White House has to say about small business? Speak with Karen Gordon Mills, the 23rd Administrator of the Small Business Administration in person.

Dying to learn how to think bigger? Brainstorm with Larry Broughton, award-winning CEO at a round table.

Save thousands of dollars in rising education costs, jumpstart your path and entrepreneurship and click here to start your free business education now.

About the Author

Named Top 100 Leaders by 2012 Magazine, Jasmine Grimm has been nominated for Central Penn Business Journal’s “Top 40 Under 40,” and The Lancaster Chamber’s ATHENA Award.

Jasmine founded Ruby, Inc. a personal styling business that teaches women how to dress for their body types and became a two-time nominee for Inc. Magazine’s Top 30 Under 30 Top Young Entrepreneurs in America. She won the 2013 SCORE Business Development Award, won the Central Penn Business Journal’s Top 25 Women of Influence Award in 2013 and the 2013 Leadership Award from the MS Society.

She has been a popular guest lecturer at the Maastricht Institute of Entrepreneurship and has been featured in Under 30 CEO and Productive Magazine, was the cover story for Harrisburg Magazine and her writing has graced National Geographic Television and Film, Harvard University and more.

She’s a 5,3,8,3 on the Kolbe A Index and her strengths include input, relator, learner, responsibility and achievement.

For more information visit her Google + Page.

20 Most Influential Business Professors Alive Today

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Influence in the business world can be hard to quantify, but there are some business professors that stand out as being among the cream of the crop. This list consists of professors that any student would count themselves fortunate to study under. The professors hail from all over the world and their experience and specialties are as diverse as the business world itself. This list of the top 20 most influential business professors strives to achieve diversity in experience, age, and perspective, and to showcase the best of the best from across the world of business.

#20. Eric Sussman

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This Senior Lecturer at the University of California Los Angeles has been voted Teacher of the Year 13 times. Not only has he had this internal honor bestowed on him for his excellence in teaching, but he was also awarded the Citibank Teaching Award, and the Neidorf Decade Teaching Award. BusinessWeek lists him as one of the top ten most popular business professors. His devotion to providing his students with practical, engaging education has made him one of the most influential business professors of our day.

#19. Shane Dikolli

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Shane Dikolli is an associate professor at Duke’s Fuqua School of Business. He is well known among students for making accounting fun, engaging, and interesting, a rare quality in what most consider to be the most tedious business field. Dikolli teaches Managerial Accounting in both the Full Time and Weekend Executive programs at Duke. He also holds editorial board member positions at several academic journals including The Accounting Review, Accounting, Organizations, and Society, Contemporary Accounting Research, and more.

#18. Greg Fairchild

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Greg Fairchild is the E. Thayer Bigelow Associate Professor of Business Administration at the University of Virginia’s Darden School of Business. He is also the academic director of Darden’s Institute for Business in Society. Fairchild teaches courses in strategic management, entrepreneurship, and ethics. He is one of Poets and Quants top fifty most influential business professors, is highly regarded by Fortune Magazine, and has been cited in Inc. Magazine, The Economist, NPR, USA Today, The New York Times and other major publications.

#17. Sharon Oster

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Sharon Oster is the Frederic D. Wolfe Professor of Management and Entrepreneurship, and the Director of the Program on Social Enterprise at the Yale School of Management. Her specialty is competitive strategy and microeconomic theory, and she has written on the subject of regulation of business and competitive strategy. One of her books, Strategic Management for Non Profit Organizations applies the competitive strategies of for profit businesses to the non profit realm. She earned her BA from Hofstra and her Ph.D. from Harvard.

#16. Alison Fragale

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This young Professor of Organizational Behavior teaches courses in negotiation, leading and managing, and leadership immersion at the Kenan-Flagler Business School at the University of North Carolina. Fragdale’s primary area of research is on the determinants and consequences of power, status, and influence in organizations. Her research has been cited by The Boston Globe and The Financial Times. She is well loved by students for teaching high impact lessons that both communicate the principles of the subject and allow students to adapt principles to their own personal experience. She has been published in the Academy of Management Review, Journal of Applied Psychology, and Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes among other major academic publications, and is a graduate of the Stanford Graduate School of Business.

#15. Stewart Friedman

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This Wharton School of Business professor is the founding director of the Wharton Leadership Program. His primary body of work has been in leadership development, work/life integration, and human resources. Friedman has been the recipient of numerous teaching awards at the University of Pennsylvania’s Wharton School of Business. Friedman’s BA is in Psychology which he earned from SUNY Binghamton, his M.A. in Psychology and his Ph.D. in Organizational Psychology he earned from the University of Michigan.

#14. Herminia Ibarra

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This INSEAD Cora Chaired Professor of Leadership and Learning, Professor of Organizational Behavior, and Area Chair for the Organizational Behavior Department has previously served on the faculty at Harvard Business School and is a member of the World Economic Forum Global Agenda Councils and also chairs the Visiting Committee of the Harvard Business School. Ibarra is a world renowned authority on professional and leadership development and her book, Working Identity: Unconventional Strategies for Reinventing Your Career, is one of the most influential works on the subject of making major changes within your current career.

#13. David Ulrich

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David Ulrich is a professor of business at the Ross School of Management at the University of Michigan. He is a speaker, author, management coach, and management consultant. Ulrich was ranked the #1 Management Educator and Guru by BusinessWeek and selected by Fast Company as one of the 10 most innovative and creative individuals in business. Ulrich earned his undergraduate degree from BYU and his doctorate from UCLA.

#12. Jeffrey Pfeffer

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This professor has been at the Stanford Graduate School of Business since 1979, though before this long held post he taught at the University of Illinois and U.C. Berkeley’s Haas School of Business. Pfeffer has authored over 120 articles and book chapters during his long career. He is one of the most provocative and influential thinkers on the subject of organizational power and politics. He earned his B.S. and M.S. from Carnegie Mellon University, and his Ph.D. from Stanford.

#11. Zeynep Ton

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Zeynep Ton is an Adjunct Professor of Operations Management at MIT’s Sloan School of Management. Ton’s current research involves discovering ways in which companies can design and manage operations in ways that satisfy the big three: employees, customers, and investors. Her works have been published in the Harvard Business Review, Organization Science, and Production and Operations Management. Ton also taught for seven years at the Harvard Business School where she was awarded the HBS faculty award for teaching excellence.

#10. Jennifer Chatman

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Now the Paul J. Cortese Professor of Management Chair of the Haas Management of Organizations Group at the Haas School of Business at U.C. Berkeley, Chatman also earned her BA in psychology and her Ph.D. in Business Administration from that same school. From the late ‘80s into the early ‘90s Chatman taught at Northwestern’s Kellogg School of Management, after which she began her career at Haas School of Business. She has been one of the foremost educators in management throughout her career and has been published extensively in world renowned business publications including the California Management Review, and the Academy of Management Journal. Chatman is also an academic partner of the consulting firm The Trium Group.

#9. Rita McGrath

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This Associate Professor of Management at Columbia University is well known for her efforts in strategy, innovation, and entrepreneurship. She pioneered the principle of discovery driven planning. McGrath graduated Magna Cum Laude from Barnard College in 1981 and earned her Masters in Public Administration from Columbia’s School of International and Public Affairs in 1982. Since then her research and teaching in the business world has had a major impact on the way business is conducted in the modern era.

#8. Lynda Gratton

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One of the most influential women and educators in the business world for nearly two and a half decades, Lynda Gratton is currently the Professor of Management Practice at the London Business School. She is the author of many books and articles dealing primarily with organisational behavior, an area of study in which she is can apply principles from her psychology education. Her undergraduate degree and Ph.D. in psychology were earned from Liverpool University. She is the founder of the Hot Spots Movement, which strives to bridge the gap between academic research and the practical applications of that research to the business world.

#7. Roger Martin

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This business leader has been  the dean of the Rotman School of Management at the University of Toronto for three terms. This is exceptional because of a two term limit generally adhered to at the school, which can only be negated by a special appointment by the president of the university. Martin remains at the University of Toronto and has refocused his attention on business strategy research and teaching. His primary focus on exploring the future of democratic capitalism is reflected in his involvement with two major think tanks, The Institute for Competitiveness and Prosperity, and The Martin Prosperity Institute, which is named for his parents. Martin has written definitive works analyzing such modern issues as the recent financial crisis, its fallout, and ways to go about fixing it through the application of capitalist principles.

#6. Prashant Kale

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This Associate Professor of Strategic Management at the Jessie H. Jones School of Business at Rice University earned his Masters of Strategic Management at UPenn’s Wharton School. Kale has been published in at least eight major business review publications including the Harvard Business Review, the Sloan Management Review at MIT, the California Management Review, and the European Management Journal. One of his management papers was one of the fifty most cited business management papers in 2011.

#5. Renee Mauborgne

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One of the most influential women in the business world, Mauborgne is the co-chair of INSEAD’s Blue Ocean Strategy Institute and an Affiliate Professor of Strategy. She is a Fellow of the World Economic Forum at Davos, and one of President Barack Obama’s advisors on Historically Black Colleges and Universities. She co-authored many articles with colleague W. Chan Kim for the Harvard Business Review, the reprints of which are international bestsellers. One series of articles have been distinguished as being among the best articles ever written for the Harvard Business Review.

#4. Raymond Hill

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This Senior Lecturer in Finance at Emory University’s Goizueta Business School began his academic career as an economics professor at Princeton. He returned to teaching in 2003 at Goizueta Business School after spending time as an investment banker with Lehman Brothers between 1982 and 1993, after which he worked for the Mirant Corporation for ten years as CFO except for 18 months during which he was CEO of one of the largest independent power companies in Asia. His undergrad degree was earned from Princeton and his Ph.D. from MIT. Bloomberg BusinessWeek named him one of the most popular professors at the top business schools in the country, a status earned because of his unique ability to use his interactive teaching style to make finance, often considered the most boring part of business education, engaging and interesting to his students.

#3. W. Chan Kim

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One of the most influential current business thinkers in the world, W. Chan Kim, is the co-director of the INSEAD Blue Ocean Strategy Institute, and is also the Boston Consulting Group Bruce D. Henderson Chaired Professor of International Management, Professor of International Strategy and Management at INSEAD, which has to be the longest title in the business world as well as one of the most prestigious. In addition to his current post, Kim has served as a professor at the University of Michigan, and a board member and advisor for many EU based multinational corporations. He is also a Fellow of the World Economic Forum, and the articles he has written for the Harvard Business Review are international bestsellers, having sold over half a million reprinted copies.

#2. Clayton Christensen

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This Harvard Business School business administration professor made a huge impact on commercial enterprises throughout his career and belongs to both the Technology and Operations Management, and General Management faculty groups at Harvard. Christiansen earned his B.A. at Brigham Young University, his M.Phil. from Oxford, and his Ph.D. from Harvard. His work on the concept of disruptive innovation has changed the way entrepreneurs and tech startups view the market, and changed the approach of an entire generation of innovators and business thinkers. Despite numerous health difficulties including a battle with cancer and a stroke, Christensen has remained one of the most influential figures in the business world.

#1. Vijay Govindarajan

Vijay-Govindarajan

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A world leader in strategy and innovation, Vijay Govindarajan is currently a professor at Dartmouth’s Tuck School of Business. This Harvard-educated businessman has been a force to be reckoned within the business world for most of his career. Vijay was rated one of Forbes’ top 50 business thinkers, and he is one of the most influential business bloggers, writing for his personal blog, the Harvard Business Review, and BusinessWeek. His resume is impressive–he has worked with over 25% of the current Fortune 500 companies. Prior to accepting his current position at Tuck, Govindarajan was on faculty at Harvard Business School, INSEAD, the Indian Institute of Management, and the International University of Japan.

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