Education vs. Experience in Entrepreneurship

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Experience taught me that I never wanted to be an entrepreneur; education taught me that I did.

This is a strange place to be.

Growing up my parents and grandparents had their own businesses. From the time I was tiny I would sweep out my grandparents’ trucks for a few bucks or sit around the dinner table with them discussing logistics, direction and profitability. I didn’t know the actual terms because I wasn’t educated. It was just part of every day life. To this day I don’t understand why people use fancy phrases like “synergy,” “efficiency,” and “ROI” when they’re speaking with one another.

I always thought it was simple: work hard, figure out what makes money and keep doing it to make more.

I also saw that they worked really hard. One set of grandparents had a mushroom farm and my Dad worked there; the other set had multiple businesses ranging from mushroom farms to selling Tahitian Noni as an independent rep to hauling Amish and running farmer’s markets. Regardless of where I went I was surrounded by people who were their own bosses who labored just as hard if not harder than those around them because they had a family business to run and grow. Their livelihood depended not only on their effort but also on the market.

I learned that when you work for someone you’re paid regardless of the outcome. When you work for yourself you work regardless of the pay.

As such I never wanted to be an entrepreneur. I wanted to take the safe route. I wanted to work for National Geographic, which I did, and go into journalism, which I did. I wanted to get paid. I wanted to put aside 20 percent of my paycheck, labor for someone else and slowly chip away at savings and remain debt free.

I did this by becoming educated in English, Mass Communications, pagination, photojournalism, and social media. I did this by spending less than I earned—until I got married and subsequently divorced then I had someone else dipping into my paycheck, so essentially it was like being an entrepreneur where you work your tail off and lose money anyway—but that’s besides the point.

I figured out ways to learn for free. I read all of the books I could in my discipline. I imagined what I wanted to do and set out to do it. I didn’t know it, actually, but I was manifesting my future by being intentional about my education and career path.

But then I studied small business management and entrepreneurial studies at Syracuse University’s Whitman School of Business. Suddenly everything changed. I realized that I was in an intrapreneurial role where I worked. This means I was using entrepreneurial skills in a department within an organization. I felt like an entrepreneur with training wheels. Syracuse taught me four things that I was able to apply to my job as a magazine editor.

First, I understood that money was a driver to either make or break the project I was working on and ultimately it wasn’t profitable because, in my opinion, it didn’t solve a need.

Second, when I took on the role, I came across all sorts of ideas that were planted in my little head and began to take root and without asking for permission I would often do them. This is a good thing and a bad thing. It’s good because I learned that if I made a decision I could execute it—without financial resources, without backing, and without permission. This is a bad thing, also, because it got me in trouble. I wasn’t trying to be a rabble-rouser. I just thought I could do something, so I did. When it panned out, it did well. When it didn’t, it flopped miserably.

Third, I learned to pivot—when things didn’t work one way I’d have to try another. Most ideas didn’t work the first five, 10 or 15 times but every once in awhile I’d stumble onto a gem of an idea that worked beautifully and I could replicate the results.

Fourth, and most importantly I learned to say no when I didn’t agree with something based on ethics, mentoring and business acumen. In business saying no can be costly. It can cost you your job, potential customers and relationships. But it can also do something important: it’ll give you a backbone, it gives you the courage to say if you think a process is working or isn’t and it gives you ownership of your project.

At some point I came to a crossroads: I knew the project I was working on was no longer feasible longterm. I knew that I like taking ideas and figuring out how to pull them off even if I had little experience and I learned that I had an entire network at Syracuse where I could call and rely on for questions and expertise.

At this juncture I became—for better or for worse—an entrepreneur and I learned the same lessons all over again from a different perspective: work hard, figure out what makes money and keep doing it to make more.

I worked hard. I became my own boss and even though I might not get paid for my efforts, my livelihood still depends on my efforts and that others will get paid regardless of the outcome.

At present, experience is teaching me that even though I didn’t want to be an entrepreneur, I am. Ongoing education is teaching me how.

About the Author

Named Top 100 Leaders by 2012 Magazine, Jasmine Grimm has been nominated for Central Penn Business Journal’s “Top 40 Under 40,” and The Lancaster Chamber’s ATHENA Award.

Jasmine founded Ruby, Inc. a personal styling business that teaches women how to dress for their body types and became a two-time nominee for Inc. Magazine’s Top 30 Under 30 Top Young Entrepreneurs in America. She won the 2013 SCORE Business Development Award, won the Central Penn Business Journal’s Top 25 Women of Influence Award in 2013 and the 2013 Leadership Award from the MS Society.

She has been a popular guest lecturer at the Maastricht Institute of Entrepreneurship and has been featured in Under 30 CEO and Productive Magazine, was the cover story for Harrisburg Magazine and her writing has graced National Geographic Television and Film, Harvard University and more.

She’s a 5,3,8,3 on the Kolbe A Index and her strengths include input, relator, learner, responsibility and achievement.

For more information visit her Google + Page

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The Best Undergrad Tip I Applied In B School

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Allow me to illustrate how deeply my hubris blinded me. Back when I was doing my undergrad on a scholarship from the Hortatio Alger Association of Distinguished Americans at Missouri Valley College studying for my B.A. in English and Mass Communications, I had a teacher named Professor Virginia Kugel-Zank. She was one of my favorite professors because she challenged my thinking. She made me think deeper and differently and this one time in class she said that our assignment was to doodle. I was aghast. I could not believe that she would suggest such an idea. I was so pompous. I thought it was ridiculous that I was going to college to learn how to doodle.

I soon ate crow. Not only did I begin to doodle all the time but I found that it enhanced my thinking. She told us about the lady who discovered the old doodle program on the computer that allowed you to sketch out ideas because she was a visual learner. She was planting a seep of entrepreneurship and doodles.

As a doodled, I found that I could imagine something, come up with a rough idea of what it looked like, sketched it out and than began to create something from the ground up. I did this when I created a digital magazine, when I imagined how I’d want a room decorated or if I wanted to zone out I began to take my doodling a little more advanced and I took an art class. I’m not any good—granted—but I can get the message across. Plus, it’s therapeutic.

As I grew older, I realized how right Professor Zank was about doodling. I learned in the Harvard Business Review that “People who doodled while listening to a monotonous message recalled 29% more information than non-doodlers on a surprise memory test, according to a study in Applied Cognitive Psychology cited by blogger Eric Barker” according to The Benefits of Doodling.

Furthermore I have used in it in a business I developed at Syracuse University’s Whitman School of Management. It’s called Ruby, Inc. and it’s a doodle I use to drive business results.

As I said before I was blind but now I see: Doodling works in entrepreneurship.

About the Author
Named Top 100 Leaders by 2012 Magazine, Jasmine Grimm has been nominated for Central Penn Business Journal’s “Top 40 Under 40,” and The Lancaster Chamber’s ATHENA Award.

Jasmine founded Ruby, Inc. a personal styling business that teaches women how to dress for their body types and became a two-time nominee for Inc. Magazine’s Top 30 Under 30 Top Young Entrepreneurs in America. She won the 2013 SCORE Business Development Award, the won the Central Penn Business Journal’s Top 25 Women of Influence Award in 2013 and the 2013 Leadership Award from the MS Society.

She has been a popular guest lecturer at the Maastricht Institute of Entrepreneurship and has been featured in Under 30 CEO and Productive Magazine, was the cover story for Harrisburg Magazine and her writing has graced National Geographic Television and Film, Harvard University and more.

She’s a 5,3,8,3 on the Kolbe A Index and her strengths include input, relator, learner, responsibility and achievement.

For more information visit her Google + Page.

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Get a B School Education from a Professor You Can Be Proud Of

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I’m here today to tell you a simple story about one of my favorite professors.

To say that Dr. Mike Haynie is passionate about veterans would be an understatement. He’s been known to shock bystanders on planes by telling them about the suicide rate of our nation’s all-volunteer armed forces. But just as much passion as he exudes for veterans he finds room in his heart for arguably his second love: entrepreneurship. His doctorate degree focuses on entrepreneurship with an emphasis in social innovation, decision-making, self-identity, and cognition. Before he was an academic, Haynie served for 14 years as an officer in the U.S. Air Force. So you can see how the two loves intersect.

Haynie was, hands down, one of the best teachers I have ever experienced at Syracuse University. I remember he didn’t teach in the typical PowerPoint manner. Rather, he stood in front of us, telling us stories of businesses in an engaging manner. He made me want to learn because he understood that our brains would remember bigger concepts before they’d remember details. My favorite tale was about the crew from New Belgium Brewing Company.

Haynie said:

I love hippies. I love beer and this is a story about both.

He talked about how Jeff Lebesch, the brewery’s founder, took his homebrewing passion commercially and was so successful that he rallied an entire crew of hippies to keep his company going. They were so passionate and so successful that a large brewing company wanted to buy them. The company was faced with a critical decision: sell the company that they were passionate about and all become millionaires or continue to build their empire based on their hippie culture.

I won’t tell you the end of the story. I’d much rather you sit back and ponder what you’d do in the same situation. Would you sell or would you develop a culture? Would you pick people or profits?

I think these are the sorts of teachers that budding entrepreneurs should pick in B school if at all possible: teachers who don’t tell you the answer, but rather allow you to explore the possibilities in the safety of a classroom first before you have to make those real-life decisions later. They’re the sorts of teachers who plant a seed and wait patiently for it to turn into innovation in the real world through the lives, actions and companies of his students. He created a veritable innovation factory for families of veterans and veterans themselves and so, bit by bit, person by person he’s creating a world that’s safe for vets to come home to, a place where they don’t feel anonymous, and a place where we can spawn the next generation of ideas that will change the post 911 world.

Don’t believe me? Just listen to his Ted Talk.

About the Author
Named Top 100 Leaders by 2012 Magazine, Jasmine Grimm has been nominated for Central Penn Business Journal’s “Top 40 Under 40,” and The Lancaster Chamber’s ATHENA Award.

Jasmine founded Ruby, Inc. a personal styling business that teaches women how to dress for their body types and became a two-time nominee for Inc. Magazine’s Top 30 Under 30 Top Young Entrepreneurs in America. She won the 2013 SCORE Business Development Award, the won the Central Penn Business Journal’s Top 25 Women of Influence Award in 2013 and the 2013 Leadership Award from the MS Society.

She has been a popular guest lecturer at the Maastricht Institute of Entrepreneurship and has been featured in Under 30 CEO and Productive Magazine, was the cover story for Harrisburg Magazine and her writing has graced National Geographic Television and Film, Harvard University and more.

She’s a 5,3,8,3 on the Kolbe A Index and her strengths include input, relator, learner, responsibility and achievement.

For more information visit her Google + Page.

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5 Things I Wish I Would Have Learned in Business School—But Didn’t

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I learned a ton when I went to business school. Don’t get me wrong. I wish that anyone would have been privy to the free education I received from the colleges and universities like Franklin & Marshall, Missouri Valley College and Syracuse University’s Whitman School of Management and now that I have a few years under my belt post grad, I wish I could take some of these lessons and infuse them into my educational system so I wouldn’t have had to learn the hard way as an entrepreneur. Well, who am I kidding? I suspect I would still have to learn the hard way—that’s part of the reason why I’m an entrepreneur in the first place.

1) Everyone will tell you to get a job.

I can’t tell you the number of times I have been told to just get a job. It’s not that I object to working hard and for someone else. I don’t. I think it’s a viable option for tons of people and at certain stages of my life I was perfectly happy to work for someone else. In fact, I enjoyed it and I would be remiss if I didn’t take the opportunity to try to make it on my own because I believe I can do it. People tell me to get a job all the time. If I run into a health insurance problem—which is a huge problem for entrepreneurs—people say, “Why don’t you just get a job?” If I have to contact the government for any sort of information and I can’t make the system work for me, they tell me to just get a job until I make $3,000 off someone else and then get fired. When a client doesn’t pay quickly enough or cash flow is tighter than I’d like it or an unexpected financial hit comes my way, I’ll be sure to hear it: Get a job.

2) A job is no more or less stable than entrepreneurship.

Companies exist to solve problems. It doesn’t matter if you’re working for someone else is working for yourself and starting your own company. As long as that problem exists and you can solve it then you’re in business. But, as an example, big companies are yearning more lean manufacturing so that leads to greater efficiency and less people to solve their problem for their customers. As a second example, the media industry is changing and countless previously employed workers are without wages because they’re not needed and as a third example, the national unemployment rate is at 7 percent for people who are older than 16. These three facts illustrate that there are countless problems that have either reached their demise or have become supremely efficient and unfortunately, job loss occurs which illustrates my point: a job isn’t more or less stable than entrepreneurship.

3) Entrepreneurship is all about solving problems.

Now the fancy explanation of entrepreneurship is: “the process of identifying and starting a business venture, sourcing and organizing the required resources and taking both the risks and rewards associated with the venture.” Dumb it down: solve a problem, collect money for it, repeat for more people with a similar problem who are willing to pay a similar amount or more.

4) Anyone can solve problems.

I know it sounds ridiculous to think that the process of entrepreneurship is this heady adventure fraught with all of these perils and somehow at the end of it you’ll triumph and become the most amazing leader of all times. Well that’s not so. Allow me to illustrate it like this and if you have kids you’ll relate: One night I found my stepson sleeping in the hallway. I picked him up and put him back in bed. A little while later, he came into my room, told me he didn’t feel well and then puked on the bed. I cleaned it up and put him back to bed. There was a problem, so I solved it. Entrepreneurship is that simple. Look around at the mess in the world and go clean it up. If you can clean up puke from a sick child you have proven that you’re capable of solving problems. Making a decision to clean up puke from the carpet is no more or less difficult than filing paperwork with an attorney to start a company. It’s just paperwork. Putting a child back to bed is no more nerve wracking than filing an EIN number and opening up a business bank account. You can solve problems. You do it every single day.

5) People are inherently scared.

You know anyone can solve problems. You know that entrepreneurship is about finding a problem and solving it and you know that entrepreneurship isn’t some daring feat: it’s just a choice. So why do so many people tell you to get a job? Why is that their go to answer for self-fulfillment? I think it’s because of fear. They’re afraid of what will happen for you if you can’t collect money on time, if times become lean or clients don’t pay immediately. They’re afraid of the consequences. They’re afraid of how you’ll judge them because you own a business and they don’t. They’re afraid of how you’ll look at them in times of plenty and want. They’re afraid of the idea of entrepreneurship and they’re afraid when you fail because somehow they might catch the failure too and they’re afraid of your success because if you succeed and they don’t then somehow they have failed, too. But none of these things are true. It’s just fear. And out of the five biggest things I wish I had learned in business school but didn’t, I wish I had learned that fear is riddled with all sorts of falsehoods that stand in the way of solving problems.

About the Author
Named Top 100 Leaders by 2012 Magazine, Jasmine Grimm has been nominated for Central Penn Business Journal’s “Top 40 Under 40,” the Woman of the Year, and The Lancaster Chamber’s ATHENA Award.

Jasmine founded Ruby, Inc. a personal styling business that teaches women how to dress for their body types and became a two-time nominee for Inc. Magazine’s Top 30 Under 30 Top Young Entrepreneurs in America. She won the 2013 SCORE Business Development Award, the won the Central Penn Business Journal’s Top 25 Women of Influence Award in 2013 and the 2013 Leadership Award from the MS Society.

She has been a popular guest lecturer at the Maastricht Institute of Entrepreneurship and has been featured in Under 30 CEO and Productive Magazine, was the cover story for Harrisburg Magazine and her writing has graced National Geographic Television and Film, Harvard University and more.

She’s a 5,3,8,3 on the Kolbe A Index and her strengths include input, relator, learner, responsibility and achievement.

For more info, see her Google+ Profile.

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How to Develop a Safe Space and Grow Professionally

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When I was working on my undergrad degrees, I had a professor named Virginia Kugel-Zank who has the most magnificent office. She had these lush purple chairs that faced her desk and the room smelled warm and inviting. She had a little gargoyle seated on her large, classic desk and to her right her room was lighted with a stained glass window. It was amazing. Professor Zank championed to have a Learning Center developed at Missouri Valley College.

As I originally wrote on the college website:

The Learning Center, nestled on the third floor of Baity Hall, was renovated in the summer of 2002. Students are invited to study in this gorgeous environment complete with the original vaulted wood ceiling, cozy seats, and glorious stained glass windows. Students have access to lightning fast Internet service, tutors in a variety of disciplines, and an open door policy to the office of the director.

The history of this room is the history of the college. MVC alumni knew this room—at various times—as a chapel, a classroom, and a lab. Former students who come back to MVC have wonderful stories to tell about the events they experienced in this room. Current students will, no doubt, add their stories of success to that history.

Today, just like it did when I was in school, The Learning Center provides academic support and encourages students to achieve their full potential.

I asked Professor Zank why this place was so important to her and she said it was important to develop a space that gives people a safe place to learn. Yes, it was a quiet study environment and yes, it was staffed with tutors, students and staff. But more than that, that space that she envisioned became the hub of the college.

Which leads me to my point: regardless of where you’re exploring and learning in the world, it’s important to develop a safe place to learn, fail and grow. Professor Zank did that with stained glass, comfortable seating, and a welcoming environment but I think it’s important to find a space that allows you to do the same regardless of the college or university you attend, which office you choose to set up as an entrepreneur or manager.

It’s important because if you don’t feel safe in your environment, how are you going to test out new theories to drive your business forward? How are you going to be compelled to do research when there’s no one looking over your shoulder to make sure you’re on task? How are you going to give yourself the opportunity to learn new tactics to implement in your programs? How are you going to engage if you don’t feel connected?

What elements can you borrow from The Learning Center to set up your own space?

  • Give yourself a quiet area. Maybe music is your thing. If so, bring headphones. But keep the space peaceful.
  • Keep contacts readily accessible. Think of them like tutors in college. If you get stuck, just call.
  • Keep it clean, clutter free, well-lighted and comfortable.
  • Make sure it’s beautiful—really beautiful so you remember the space long after you’re gone.

If you make yourself an inspirational environment, you’ll reach your business potential.

About the Author

Named Top 100 Leaders by 2012 Magazine, Jasmine Grimm has been nominated for Central Penn Business Journal’s “Top 40 Under 40,” and The Lancaster Chamber’s ATHENA Award.

Jasmine founded Ruby, Inc. a personal styling business that teaches women how to dress for their body types and became a two-time nominee for Inc. Magazine’s Top 30 Under 30 Top Young Entrepreneurs in America. She won the 2013 SCORE Business Development Award, the won the Central Penn Business Journal’s Top 25 Women of Influence Award in 2013 and the 2013 Leadership Award from the MS Society.

She has been a popular guest lecturer at the Maastricht Institute of Entrepreneurship and has been featured in Under 30 CEO and Productive Magazine, was the cover story for Harrisburg Magazine and her writing has graced National Geographic Television and Film, Harvard University and more.

She’s a 5,3,8,3 on the Kolbe A Index and her strengths include input, relator, learner, responsibility and achievement.

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Learn Grit Like a CEO

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As an entrepreneur I have had to develop grit, courage and commitment. Frankly, I either suck at it or I have a convoluted image of myself. I can share with you what I’ve learned from experience and educational resources how I developed the little reserve I have in my arsenal.
What little grit I have I gathered not from any specific educational courses but rather from adversity.
Unfortunately there is a direct correlation between suffering and the skillsets needed to endure the suffering.
I’ve found the classes that give me the most grit that I’m able to apply to my business haven’t been from college necessarily, though overloading myself with 20 credits a semester and plowing through my undergrad in two years didn’t exactly make me a sissy, but taking self-defense classes through marine corp martial arts, jiu jitsu and krav maga. Within these classes at Direct Action Tactical, I got the snot kicked out of me on a regular basis. I tore my ACL, was knocked out a few times, pushed my body so hard I vomited. Now, I’m not saying everyone who wants to be an entrepreneur needs to put themselves through this kind of self-inflicted torture but I’m not saying it hurts, either. In my experience I have found the best way to develop grit is to force yourself to endure the painful, to push just past what you think you could otherwise do and then show up the next day even when you know it’s going to be ruthless.
There are countless educational opportunities out there to challenge you. If you’re clumsy like I am, try signing up for something that requires grace like ballet at a local college or university. Know you’re going to be awful at it. Do it anyway and measure your success in tiny increments. You’ll find you have more grit than you realize. When you don’t back down regardless of the obstacles in your way, you’ll develop grit.
Curious how gritty you are? Take Harvard researcher Angela Duckworth’s 12 point Grit Test then try something that isn’t within your wheel house. Take the test again and ask yourself if you’re as gritty as you initially thought. According to my results, I’m gritty but I know from experience that I also struggle in the face of prolonged adversity.
I also know that those who accomplish greatness in life combine their passion for a mission with dedication. They just don’t stop until they reach their goal.
I have learned that I have to develop courage. I think I’m pretty wimpy sometimes though others have said I can be little but mighty. I don’t think I am any more or less courageous than any other person. I have days when I am terrified—like giving a speech to a gigantic audience and my stomach hurts so bad I think I am going to yack, or walking into a conference room to deliver bad news and deciding to tell the truth anyway even when a boss tells you to do otherwise, or being terrified to look your spouse in the face and tell them that even though you love them they pushed you too far and that the past can’t be rectified. My stomach hurts more days than I care to admit, but on those days I think back to what I want my legacy to be. I learned to develop a legacy though Michael Hyatt’s Life Plan.
And through that life plan I have been tested on my values, and that’s where commitment comes into play. Even when it’s tough, I have to live my values not only because they’re going to translate into my business but because that’s how I want people to remember me when I’m gone. Now, I have failed countless times. I have not lived up to the ideal that I have for myself over and over again. And I beat myself up ruthlessly for it. But I stay committed to it because I realize that no one is going to remember me if I can’t remember to do what I say I’m going to do.
If I want to be an enterpriser, I have to think like this and then I have to act in this way. I have to shape my thoughts and not allow the world, circumstances or obstacles shape my future.
I have to learn to develop more grit, more courage and more commitment because if I want to reach my big goals I can’t get there with the same small thoughts, the same small actions, and the same small beliefs that I have held in the past. I have to teach myself something greater and learn grit, commitment and courage.
The best teacher, by far, I have learned is none other than adversity.
About the Author
Named Top 100 Leaders by 2012 Magazine, Jasmine Grimm has been nominated for Central Penn Business Journal’s “Top 40 Under 40,” and The Lancaster Chamber’s ATHENA Award.
Jasmine founded Ruby, Inc. a personal styling business that teaches women how to dress for their body types and became a two-time nominee for Inc. Magazine’s Top 30 Under 30 Top Young Entrepreneurs in America. She won the 2013 SCORE Business Development Award, the won the Central Penn Business Journal’s Top 25 Women of Influence Award in 2013 and the 2013 Leadership Award from the MS Society.
She has been a popular guest lecturer at the Maastricht Institute of Entrepreneurship and has been featured in Under 30 CEO and Productive Magazine, was the cover story for Harrisburg Magazine and her writing has graced National Geographic Television and Film, Harvard University and more.
She’s a 5,3,8,3 on the Kolbe A Index and her strengths include input, relator, learner, responsibility and achievement.
For more information visit her Google + Page.

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What’s the best degree for becoming an entrepreneur?

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Starting your own business is incredibly exciting but also very risky, as you could either end up a major success or an unfortunate failure. Because of this risk, many entrepreneurs like to prepare themselves for starting their business as much as possible before they take the plunge. Often, they look to college as a tool which can help them learn all of the skills that they need to know in order to become a business success and not invest a bunch of money in a great idea only to have it flounder and not make any of their money back for them. Many aspiring entrepreneurs don’t really know which degree to get, though, and the answer isn’t really that simple.

What Type of Business do You Want to Start?

You could always go for an entrepreneurship or business degree, as this will give you the blanket knowledge needed to start a business. But is this the right decision? Really, the answer comes down to the type of business that you want to start. For the most part, an entrepreneurship or business degree is the best way to go, but if you want to start a restaurant or a hair salon, you might want to look at a more specialized degree. In fact, most culinary and beauty schools offer business courses that examine the specifics on how to run those specific businesses. After all, a business degree can teach you the basic concepts on how to run a fine dining establishment, but a culinary school will get way more into detail, giving you information on how to arrange your menu and where to find the best suppliers for your meat, etc.

Should You Get a Degree at All?

Some of the most successful business owners and high ranking executives out there actually don’t have any college degrees. Two famous examples are Steve Jobs and Mark Zuckerberg. Both became billionaires and corporate legends, and they did it all after dropping out of college to pursue their dreams. However, both made some pretty questionable decisions regarding their businesses, and while Jobs’ untimely death came before he had a chance to fall, many professionals agree that Zuckerberg’s Facebook is seeing the beginning of the end. Would he make better business decisions if he had gotten his degree? Or would things go the same way no matter what? Once again, this is a risk that the young entrepreneur made, and only time will tell if the decision pays off.

When in Doubt, go for Entrepreneurship

The fact of the matter is that getting a college degree will better prepare you for the long and difficult road ahead. Starting a business is no small task, and you are going to need all the help that you can get. If you don’t know the specific type of business that you would like to start, it would be best to go for a blanket entrepreneurship degree to learn all the ins and outs of running your own company. If you come up with a great idea along the way, you can always change your major or even drop out like Zuckerberg did. It’s important to keep in mind that he only dropped out once he knew that Facebook was going to be a success, though.

Resources

http://businessmajors.about.com/od/degreeoptions/a/Should-I-Earn-An-Entrepreneurship-Degree.htm

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Hello world!

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Welcome to WordPress. This is your first post. Edit or delete it, then start blogging!

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